MrGame Video Game / Display Board

1B11191/0

Dakar and Motor Show used the 1B11191 video game board. It features two-bit (four colour) operation.

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Mac Attack and World Cup '90 used the xxxxxxx video game board. It features five-bit (32 colour) operation and more ROM sockets to hold the increased data needed for the games.

Gone are the old-school high voltage gas discharge displays used on pinball machines in the 1980s and 1990s, and enter a small colour monitor, complete with a high-voltage monitor control board, and a complete video game board mounted in the backbox.

When the game is being played as a pinball machine, the monitor is used to display player scores and game information. There are also video game modes, where the monitor is used to play the game.

This board is based on a Z80 processor and 8255 PIA, with its own set of ROMs and RAM (more RCA CDM6264 static RAM, as well as eight 93411 RAM chips). It has a set of DIP switches as well, which control some aspects of the board's operation.

Switches: Dakar
SwitchFunction
1 Board Test
2 Unknown
3 Unknown
4 Unknown
Switches: Motor Show
SwitchFunction
1 Board Test
2 Dragster Difficulty
3 F1 Difficulty
4 Motocross Difficulty
Switches: Mac Attack
SwitchFunction
1 Board Test
2 Unknown
3 Unknown
4 Unknown
Switches: World Cup '90
SwitchFunction
1 Board Test
2 Unknown
3 Unknown
4 Unknown

STS MG88M1

Used only on the 100 or so Fast Track games produced after World Cup '90, this board drives a monochrome green monitor mounted face-down in the backbox and reflected off of a stainless steel mirror so that the player can see it through a window in the backglass.

74S288 PROM

The 1B11191/0 board uses three 27265 EPROMs for game code and data, plus a 74S288 PROM (purpose unknown). 27256 EPROMs are common, easy to get, and easy to program, but the 74S288 is almost unknown and obsolete. Jameco lists them as being available, so if you have a programmer that can handle them, or know somebody who has one, you may be able to work with these. If, on the other hand, you don't or are in a hurry, it is possible to make an adapter to fit a 2716 EPROM in the place of the 74S288.

74S288 PinFunction2716 Pin
1 D0 9
2 D1 10
3 D2 11
4 D3 13
5 D4 14
6 D5 15
7 D6 16
8 GND 12,1,2,3,19,22,23
9 D7 17
10 A0 8
11 A1 7
12 A2 6
13 A3 5
14 A4 4
15 G (chip select) 20,18
16 VCC +5V 24,21

The resulting adapter looks like:
Parts!Completed 74S288 to 2716 adapter